While some races have yet to be decided, the American electorate voted for Democrats to take the House majority while increasing the Senate majority held by Republicans. 

The number of seats controlled by Democrats in the House of Representatives is projected to be around 230 seats, with Republicans holding around 206 seats, giving Democrats a majority of approximately 24 seats. In the U.S. Senate, Republicans maintained and grew their majority. It is projected that Republicans will win the remaining Senate races in Arizona, Florida and Mississippi, giving Republicans a 53 to 47 majority. The final count for both chambers will not be announced for some time, as recounts have already been called for. Democrats performed well in state elections, making dents in near historic GOP control of governorships and state legislatures, but missed a number of opportunities to flip legislative chambers or governorships in key battleground states. 

Democratic trifectas (party control of both chambers and the governorship) increased from 7 to 14 states, while GOP trifectas decreased from 26 to 23 states. The GOP now controls 62 of 99 legislative chambers, a decrease from 67 chambers. Of the 26 governorships the GOP defended this cycle, Democrats picked up seven new governorships, and the GOP prevailed only in Alaska out of 10 possible pickup opportunities.

Several ABC members ran for federal and state offices yesterday. The results:

• Steve Cona (R-Fla.) won the election for Hillsborough County School Board 1 in Florida.
• Chuck Goodrich (R-Ind.-29) won the election for Indiana’s 29th State House District.
• Bill Lee (R-Tenn.) won the election for governor of Tennessee.
• Carol Miller (R-W.Va.-3) won the election for West Virginia’s 3rd Congressional District.
• Jeff Kipfmiller won the election for Freeland School Board in Freeland, Michigan.
• Mick Rich (R-N.M.) lost the New Mexico Senate race. 

Don’t forget to participate in ABC's post-election webinar on Thursday, Nov. 8, at 4 p.m. EST. Exclusively for members, ABC National government affairs team members will discuss how the election results are likely to affect state and federal politics and policy. Register today.