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ABC issues news releases on the latest workforce, policy and industry issues, as well as construction-related economic data and trends. Commercial and industrial construction economic analyses include federal data on construction spending, employment, GDP and the Producer Price Index, as well as state-by-state construction unemployment estimates.

In addition, ABC produces the Construction Backlog Indicator, the only economic indicator that reflects the amount of work that will be performed by commercial and industrial construction contractors in the months ahead, and the Construction Confidence Index, a diffusion index that signals construction contractors’ expectations for sales, profit margins and staffing levels. ABC construction economic releases are published according to this schedule 



For media inquiries, please contact Rachel O’Grady, ABC’s media relations director, at ogrady@abc.org or (202) 905-2104.

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Posts Tagged 'construction economics'

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Construction Unemployment Rates Improve in 10 States Year-Over-Year

WASHINGTON, D.C., Mar 23— Construction unemployment rates (not seasonally adjusted (NSA)) were down in 10 states and unchanged in three in January on a year-over-year basis, according to analysis released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). For the nation and 37 states, rates were higher than in January 2016, ending 75 consecutive months of year-over-year declines. The national NSA construction unemployment rate of 9.4 percent was up 0.9 percent from January 2016, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Construction Unemployment Rates Improve in 26 States Year-Over-Year

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan 31.—December not seasonally adjusted (NSA) construction unemployment rates were down in 26 states and the nation on a year-over-year basis, according to analysis released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). The rates for two states, Iowa and Wisconsin, were unchanged from December 2015. The national NSA construction unemployment rate of 7.4 percent was down 0.1 percent from a year ago, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Construction Unemployment Rates Improve in 32 States Year-Over-Year, ABC Says

WASHINGTON, D.C., Oct. 31—September not seasonally adjusted (NSA) construction unemployment rates improved in 32 states and the nation on a year-over-year basis, according to analysis released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). The national NSA construction unemployment rate of 5.2 percent was 0.3 percent lower than a year ago, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Construction’s Contribution to Economy Increases in 30 States in 2015

WASHINGTON, D.C., Aug. 17– The value added by the private construction industry as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) increased in 30 states and decreased in only six in 2015, according to a report released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). Nationally, construction’s direct contribution to GDP increased by 0.1 percent to 3.9 percent from 2014 to 2015.

ABC, AIA and NAHB Economists Predict Industry Growth Through 2017

WASHINGTON, D.C., Aug. 15– Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Chief Economist Anirban Basu, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Chief Economist Kermit Baker and National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Chief Economist Robert Dietz predicted continued growth for the construction industry in 2017 during a joint economic forecast today.

ABC, AIA & NAHB Economists Predict Residential & Nonresidential Construction Growth in 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 3 – Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Chief Economist Anirban Basu, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Chief Economist Kermit Baker and National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Chief Economist David Crowe predicted continued construction industry growth in 2016 today during a joint economic forecast  web conference.

Year-End Construction Backlog Drops 1 Percent

According to Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), the Construction Backlog Indicator (CBI) for the fourth quarter of 2014 declined 0.1 months, or 1 percent.  Despite the quarter-over-quarter decline, backlog ended the year at 8.7 months, which is still 4.4 percent higher than one year ago.  

Investment in Nonresidential Structures Expands Moderately in Fourth Quarter

Real gross domestic product (GDP) expanded 2.6 percent (seasonally adjusted annual rate) during the fourth quarter of 2014, following a 5 percent increase in the third quarter according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis Jan. 30 release. Nonresidential fixed investment grew by only 1.9 percent after expanding 8.9 percent in the third quarter. Investment in equipment declined 1.9 percent, while investment in nonresidential structures increased 2.6 percent.

Construction Materials Prices Dip in December

Construction input prices dipped 1.4 percent during the final month of 2014 and are down nearly 1 percent on a year-over-year basis, according to the Jan. 15 producer price index release from the U.S. Department of Labor. Inputs to nonresidential construction fell even farther, down 1.7 percent for the month and 1.9 percent year over year. December’s report marks the sharpest decline in input prices since late 2008 during the global financial crisis and the fifth consecutive month construction materials prices have failed to rise.

ABC Predicts Continued Construction Industry Growth in 2015

Washington, D.C. - Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) forecasts a steady and ongoing economic recovery for the U.S. commercial and industrial construction industries in 2015. The reasonably brisk industry recovery in 2014 should continue in 2015, with momentum especially growing in segments closely related to the current American energy and industrial production resurgence.